2016 Internal Communications Measurement Survey Results

PoliteMail Software commissioned Gill Research to conduct the 2016 Internal Communications Measurement Survey to examine how internal communications professionals define and measure the success of their efforts.

Nearly 600 internal comms professionals participated, giving us a deep look into the world of measurement: Who measures and to what extent, what challenges and obstacles they face, which channels and tools they use, and more.

Who Is Measuring?

90% of respondents are located in the Americas, and organizational size split almost evenly across three tiers: 37% have 1,000 or fewer employees, 34% have 1,001 to 10,000 employees, and 29% have more than 10,001 employees.

Although communicators are making an effort to measure internal communications efforts, most are still unsure of what to measure, how to measure success, and, in particular, how to measure behavioral changes. 20% of respondents admit they measure very little and 15% don’t measure at all. More than half (60%), however, measure at least some of their work.

Benefits of Measuring Internal Comms

Those who do measure internal communications cite a variety of benefits:

  • Stronger employee engagement (76%)
  • Support of senior executives (54%)
  • Proof of ROI (44%)
  • Larger internal communications budgets (22%)

Top Measurement Challenges

Since PoliteMail’s 2014 survey, more communicators report that lack of time, tools, and staff are the biggest obstacles to measurement. More than half of current respondents struggle with understaffing, which in turn makes it difficult for them to spend time on measurement.

  • Lack of time and/or personnel 63%)
  • Lack of tools (63%)
  • Lack of budget (42%)

Get the Complete Survey Results

The 2016 Internal Communications Measurement Survey found that despite the many challenges, communicators are refining their strategies to deliver maximum impact.

To learn more, download a copy of our complete 2016 Internal Measurement Survey Results. 

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