Tag Archives: B2B Email Marketing

2016 Internal Communications Measurement Survey Results

PoliteMail Software commissioned Gill Research to conduct the 2016 Internal Communications Measurement Survey to examine how internal communications professionals define and measure the success of their efforts.

Nearly 600 internal comms professionals participated, giving us a deep look into the world of measurement: Who measures and to what extent, what challenges and obstacles they face, which channels and tools they use, and more.

Who Is Measuring?

90% of respondents are located in the Americas, and organizational size split almost evenly across three tiers: 37% have 1,000 or fewer employees, 34% have 1,001 to 10,000 employees, and 29% have more than 10,001 employees.

Although communicators are making an effort to measure internal communications efforts, most are still unsure of what to measure, how to measure success, and, in particular, how to measure behavioral changes. 20% of respondents admit they measure very little and 15% don’t measure at all. More than half (60%), however, measure at least some of their work.

Benefits of Measuring Internal Comms

Those who do measure internal communications cite a variety of benefits:

  • Stronger employee engagement (76%)
  • Support of senior executives (54%)
  • Proof of ROI (44%)
  • Larger internal communications budgets (22%)

Top Measurement Challenges

Since PoliteMail’s 2014 survey, more communicators report that lack of time, tools, and staff are the biggest obstacles to measurement. More than half of current respondents struggle with understaffing, which in turn makes it difficult for them to spend time on measurement.

  • Lack of time and/or personnel 63%)
  • Lack of tools (63%)
  • Lack of budget (42%)

Get the Complete Survey Results

The 2016 Internal Communications Measurement Survey found that despite the many challenges, communicators are refining their strategies to deliver maximum impact.

To learn more, download a copy of our complete 2016 Internal Measurement Survey Results. 

3 Internal Email Metrics More Valuable Than Open Rate

You’ve just finished composing an important internal email communication, created a compelling graphic to grab your employees attention, and survived rounds of content edits and approvals. After rereading it a few more times, you hit send — now all that’s left to do is sit back and celebrate your successful broadcast (well that, and getting going on the next one)!

But the send is only half your success.  Did people read it? Now it’s time to consider the second half: measurement.

Why Measuring Internal Communications Makes a Difference

Think about all of the time you spend writing, reviewing and sending internal emails. You put in countless hours each week, and suffer through significant changes to content and style?  You’re not sure who’s approach is better.  What really works? If you aren’t measuring your communications, you can’t really answer that question. When you start tracking your email metrics, and comparing results of all your internal communications — then you will have the results to prove what works and improve what doesn’t.

Here are a few benefits of measuring your internal communications:

Whether you send to 1,000 employees or 100,000, the objective of your internal communications is to inform employees, educate and motivate them, and boost their engagement with your business. To make the most of what you’re doing, measurement can provide the insights you need, with the right metrics.

Looking at the Big Picture

It’s easy to get tunnel vision and focus just on your email open rate as a key performance indicator. On the surface, this seems like a good metric because it tells you how many employees read your message, right? Not quite.

Open rates are just a piece of the bigger picture when it comes to measuring your internal communications’ success — and they are usually misleading. Whether someone spends one second or 10 minutes on your email, the open count is the same. Depending on the email service you use, someone who reads your email may never be counted because they didn’t click to download images in the email.

Here are three more important email metrics that will give you a more accurate measurement of your internal communications’ performance.

#1: Time on Page

The key email metric is time on page, also known as the read rate. That tells you how long the person has the message opened — not just that they opened it.

By measuring the time on the page, you’ll have a much more accurate picture of if people are actually reading or ignoring your content.  You are sending the message for a reason, so you want to know if people are taking the time necessary to read it.

If not, you can change your content, your layout, and other message component and compare results to see what works to get your message read.  A read time metric is critical if you want to improve the value of you email messaging.

Of course, you’ll have the occasional employee who leaves the email open while they run to the break room, but a good analytics tool should factor that in.

#2: Click-Through Rates

This metric is pretty simple: The click-through rate is when someone clicks a link in your email.

For news and action oriented messages, it’s a great metric to measure your employees’ engagement.  You are trying to get someone to do something. You could link to a video, an internal blog or intranet news story, an online survey or social media page — whatever it is, it’s good to what percentage of our audience actually did it.  And if they didn’t click, but really need to, being able to reach back out to that specific group is essential to successful communications efforts.

It’s also beneficial to measure mobile and desktop click-through. According to an Experian email report, 58 percent of email opens occur on a mobile phone or tablet — so your click-through rates may be affected if your message isn’t mobile friendly, or if your content is not accessible via mobile devices.

#3: Email Engagement Vs. Employee Engagement

These metrics are related, but not the same. Email engagement is how interactive employees are with your digital communications over time. Consistently high readership and click through means high engagement. When you see engagement fall off, that is a leading indicator that you need a content refresh or a new messaging strategy.

Employee engagement might be a soft metric, but it is important to the executive suite, as higher employee engagement has been correlated to higher company profitability. Engaged employees also have higher morale and stay with the company longer. Employee engagement is typically measured through annual surveys or focus groups.

When employees are engaged with your digital communications, including email, likes and comments on your Intranet and company social channels, blog and social media interactions, they are more likely to rate higher on engagement surveys.

“Highly engaged employees make the customer experience. Disengaged employees break it.” —Timothy R. Clark, founder of LeaderFactor

Wondering how to get started with email measurement?

Ready to stop the guesswork and learn how to measure and get the most out of your internal communication efforts?

Download PoliteMail’s “Guide to Internal Communications Measurement.”

On Measuring Employee Engagement

With Gallup’s latest “State of the Global Workplace” report revealing that 63% of the world’s workforce are not engaged – and a further 24% are actively disengaged – employee engagement is as hot a topic as ever.

A recent Ragan article points out four new ways to measure staff engagement levels, as methods such as surveys, mood monitors and focus groups have become increasingly outdated, unpopular and perhaps not entirely accurate.

 

Colleagues

How a member of staff interacts with others is a good indication of their level of engagement in the workplace. A person’s colleagues significantly affect how they feel, act and operate on a day-to-day level, and the ratio of highly-engaged to lesser-engaged workers impact overall morale.

 

Relationships

Similarly, the number of close or strong connections an employee has at work affects their level of engagement. Regular interaction with co-workers increases engagement, and variability is important, exposing employees to different ideas and inspiration outside of their immediate day-to-day network.

 

Management quality

Generally speaking, the more time an employee gets to spend with their leader or manager – either direct or organizational – the higher you can expect their engagement levels to be.

 

Schedule

Having an irregular or disorderly schedule will drastically reduce engagement levels, as will too many distractions in the workplace. Engagement can be determined by the amount of ‘meaningful work’ that an employee is able to do between meetings, events and so on.

Read the full article here: http://www.ragan.com/InternalCommunications/Articles/49278.aspx