Tag Archives: Corporate Communications

2016 Internal Communications Measurement Survey Results

PoliteMail Software commissioned Gill Research to conduct the 2016 Internal Communications Measurement Survey to examine how internal communications professionals define and measure the success of their efforts.

Nearly 600 internal comms professionals participated, giving us a deep look into the world of measurement: Who measures and to what extent, what challenges and obstacles they face, which channels and tools they use, and more.

Who Is Measuring?

90% of respondents are located in the Americas, and organizational size split almost evenly across three tiers: 37% have 1,000 or fewer employees, 34% have 1,001 to 10,000 employees, and 29% have more than 10,001 employees.

Although communicators are making an effort to measure internal communications efforts, most are still unsure of what to measure, how to measure success, and, in particular, how to measure behavioral changes. 20% of respondents admit they measure very little and 15% don’t measure at all. More than half (60%), however, measure at least some of their work.

Benefits of Measuring Internal Comms

Those who do measure internal communications cite a variety of benefits:

  • Stronger employee engagement (76%)
  • Support of senior executives (54%)
  • Proof of ROI (44%)
  • Larger internal communications budgets (22%)

Top Measurement Challenges

Since PoliteMail’s 2014 survey, more communicators report that lack of time, tools, and staff are the biggest obstacles to measurement. More than half of current respondents struggle with understaffing, which in turn makes it difficult for them to spend time on measurement.

  • Lack of time and/or personnel 63%)
  • Lack of tools (63%)
  • Lack of budget (42%)

Get the Complete Survey Results

The 2016 Internal Communications Measurement Survey found that despite the many challenges, communicators are refining their strategies to deliver maximum impact.

To learn more, download a copy of our complete 2016 Internal Measurement Survey Results. 

5 Reasons Internal Comms Teams Don’t Measure Their Email (And Why They’re Just Excuses)

What is the most important thing to your company: employees or customers? You can’t really have one without the other, making it a bit of a chicken-or-the-egg quandary.

So, you approach them the same: Measuring your internal communications’ success just like you do your external marketing’s success. (Oh, not quite?)

You’re not alone. In our online survey, 68 percent of the 776 communicators surveyed said they currently measure some internal communications. Of those who do measure, the majority measure 40 percent or less of their internal campaigns.

I hope that more of us can turn the rhetoric about measurement into reality. Data is the route to improving our practice, helping our colleagues make better communication decisions and gaining fresh insights into our audiences.

Liam FitzPatrick, managing partner, Working Communications Strategies

Why Should You Measure Internal Communications?

You probably know the benefits of using internal communications, like how it encourages company-wide engagement, improves employee morale, increases productivity and helps build employee loyalty.

But what about the benefits of measuring those communications? Here are just a few:

  • Highlights what’s working (and what isn’t)
  • Shows where your time would be better spent
  • Allows you to assess the success of your campaigns
  • Helps you know which channels to use for what messages

In short, once you see what your communications is doing effectively, you can put more of your resources toward those efforts.

Internal Versus External Communications

Your company’s internal communications measurement blueprint shouldn’t be much different from its external communications strategy: Measure audience, channels and interactions.

Think about it this way: You wouldn’t send thousands of email marketing messages out to your customers without measurement data — and you should approach internal communications with the same mentality, but using different tools optimized for internal comms.

While the benefits of measuring internal communications are clear, your team might still have some concerns. Luckily, there are pretty simple solutions for their five common excuses.

1. My Internal Communications Team Is Understaffed

You don’t hear communications teams complaining they have too many people on staff and too little work to manage. So it’s no wonder a lack of tools is the biggest roadblock teams face.

Fifty-four percent of communicators who measure their communications said their biggest challenge was the lack of tools, followed by lack of time (52 percent) and lack of manpower (50 percent).

Measurement doesn’t have to be hard, or require learning something new. Measurement tools that plug into their current workflow and make their jobs easier can help ease the burden. The data they produce will help teams prove their value by showing results to their internal clients.

2. We Don’t Have the Budget

This is a favorite excuse for not measuring internal communications — it appears financially responsible.

But there’s a good argument that says you can’t afford not to measure your internal communications.

Think about all of the time and effort that go into creating and sending internal email, then think about all the time you ask of employees to read those messages. Time is money! Shouldn’t you be spending those resources efficiently? To do that, you need to measure what’s working, and what isn’t.

3. We Don’t Have Access to the Data

You’ve collected data on page views and click-through. Great! Can you take action on it?

You’d be surprised how many communications teams aren’t able to view their own internal communications metrics. They have to request reports, and wait.

It’s important to use tools that give you easy access to the data. The more barriers you can eliminate for your communications team, the more likely they are to measure emails (and yield results).

4. We’re Unhappy With Our Measurement Tools

Maybe you’re using a low-cost email marketing tool — or got a good deal on an entry-level communications measurement tool — to save a little money. That sounds promising on the surface, but if your team isn’t actually using it because the data isn’t accurate, or if they don’t like it, or it creates more work than necessary, you’re really just throwing money away.

Not all measurement tools are created equal, so do your homework before deciding on one. Enlist the help of your communications team to test options and pick the one they will be happy with and actually use — because isn’t that the point?

5. We Don’t Know What to Measure

It’s easy to get lost in the numbers. What’s important is to focus on the measurements that align with your team’s goals.

First, figure out what’s important to you. Does it matter more if people open an email, or if they actually read it? Establish a baseline measurement, a set a time period to track key metrics against your improvement objective. Then make changes and compare results.

Here are some examples:

  • Increase recipients’ time on page by 20 percent within six months.
  • Increase your internal communications click-through rate on news articles by 10 percent within one year.

Your objectives should be challenging but not impossible. You don’t want your team’s next excuse to be that they aren’t measuring communications because they can’t meet expectations.

How To Start Measuring Internal Comms

email-measurement-mattersThe minute your team stops making excuses for why it isn’t measuring internal communications is when they’ll start having real success.

Ready to get the most from your internal communications? Download PoliteMail’s guide for tips and insights on how to measure your communications.

Christmas in July

Big ships are slow to turn.  Large enterprise customers make very deliberate and careful decisions.  The benefits of measuring and improving employee email communications using Outlook email analytics are often understood within an hour.  The process of making business cases, technical and security reviews, and procurement cycles in companies of 25,000, 50,000, 100,000 and 300,000 employees occurs, due to the very nature of their size, in slow motion.

Which is why the end of the fiscal year and the beginning of the new one is so exciting.  Communicators may have been waiting literally years to get modern email communication tools.  The approval process crawls forward, as the email analytics project slips through the hoops to arrive as an item within the enterprise budget cycle.  Then, seeming suddenly, this month and next, the flood gates open.  Email measurement finally has a budget, the technical and data security light is green, we’re moving ahead.  Now, after months or years of evaluation, the question becomes how fast can we get it implemented?  Yes, it’s a joy to tear open the wrapping isn’t it?!

Why Positive Customer Experiences Hinge on Employee Engagement

Most business leaders will tell you that customers and their experiences are the most important part of business. They also acknowledge that employee engagement is pivotal to the success of their business. After all, employees are the ones who will help form a first impression of your brand- and if they are feeling demotivated it is likely that they will not delivery during the first interaction.

An article on the Entrepreneur website lists four ways leaders can ensure employees are primed to deliver first-rate customer experience:

  1. Shorten Feedback Loops
    It’s become the norm to only give employees feedback twice a year. However, the half-a year gap in between gives employees the impression that feedback is being provided only because leaders are being obliged to. As evidence for shortening the feedback loops, Forbes notes that 43% of highly engaged employees get feedback at least once a week, compared to 18% of employees with low engagement.
  2. Tap into Your Employees’ Customer Insights
    It is widely known that high employee engagement mutually benefits the company and its staff. This is particularly apparent by simply sitting down with employees and asking for their thoughts and ideas, based on their front-line customer experience. in doing so, they will be more appreciative of you taking the time to heat, discuss and consider what they say, while you will come away with some crucial customer insights.
  3. Adopt a Personal Approach
    There are a few ways to let your employees know that you appreciate all that they do for the business- however, it should go further than the standard note. In the digital age, everything seems to be done via email including “well dones” and “thank yous”. While any appreciative comment should be recognized, delivering it in handwritten form makes it a little more personal.
  4. Communicate Your Goals
    More than one in ten employees are disengaged at work, according to statistics. The reasons behind their disengagement at work might be more straightforward than you would think. Perhaps they feel they are not able to work to their full potential because they are not being included in essential project plans and goals.

Read the full article here.

Improving the Enagement of Millennial Employees

This year the US Census Bureau predicts Millennials will outnumber Baby Boomers and members of Generation X. With the expected changes more and more businesses are adapting their strategies and operations to meet the needs of this demographic. A recent article on business.com offered some suggestions for how business leaders can engage Millennial workers, while ensuring future success for their company.

  1. Define Responsibilities and Expectations
    Being clear about your expectations from the very beginning helps to ensure that you are giving the employer/employee relationship the best possible start. From the moment they first read the job description, candidates should be aware of what their responsibilities are. As time goes on, keeping them up to date with individual and company goals will help them understand what they should be doing and how they can help the company move forward.
  2. Promote Collaboration (Not Competition!)
    Modern workforces are more about working together and less about competing with other colleagues. An intelligence Group study found that 88% of Millennials prefer to work in an environment that’s based on collaboration rather than competition. We’re all working towards the same goal, so why not work toward those goals together, faster.
  3. Think Beyond Traditional Management
    Managers used to be like supervisors, overseeing teams and ensuring that everyone performed their roles correctly. Nowadays, younger workers want their managers to be more supportive and involved, acting much like a coach or mentor. Taking this approach makes employees feel more cares for, and makes them feel like their boss wants them to perform at their personal best. This approach can often create deeper bonds and improves performance.
  4. Be Flexible
    Flexibility is key for the Generation Y workforce. Businesses should do their best to facilitate more of a work/life balance, such as offering flexible hours and telecommuting opportunities. As well as allowing your employees to have a life outside of work, which makes them more productive in the workplace, it helps foster a trusting relationship between staff and bosses. If you respect and appreciate them (and their time), they are more likely to offer the same in return.

Read the full article here